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Gastroscopy

Gastric ulcers are common in horses and can effect horses of many types. The effect of gastric ulceration may be highly variable but they are believed to be associated with weight loss, changes in eating behaviour, loss of performance and colic, although in many horses, they may cause few or no apparent ill-effects.

At the moment the only accurate and reliable way to diagnose gastric ulceration in horses is by gastroscopy (endoscopic examination). Gastroscopy allows examination of the stomach and any ulceration can be graded depending on how deep and how widespread the ulceration is.

Gastroscopy is performed under sedation and sometimes using a twitch. The gastroscopy is a 3 meter long flexible fibre optic camera. It is passed up one of the nostrils, the horse then swollows the gastroscope and the scope is passed down into the stomach. Once inside the stomach, the stomach is inflated with air to allow full examination and the gastroscope is manouvered to examine different regions of the stomach.

The procedure is usually well-tolerated by the horse and takes around 20 minutes.  Horses are ready to travel home when the sedation has begun to wear off (usually after about 30 minutes).

Please note:-

  • YOUR HORSE MUST BE STARVED FOR AT LEAST 14 HOURS BEFORE THE APPOINTMENT.
  • WATER SHOULD BE WITHHELD FOR 2 HOURS BEFORE THE APPOINTMENT.

The stomach cannot be fully examined if the horse has not been starved.  Both food and water can be made available to the horse as soon as the effects of the sedation have worn off.

There are rarely any untoward side effects of gastroscopy, although occasionally a horse may show mild colic symptoms associated with distension of the stomach by air (this usually resolves one the air is withdrawn at the completion of the procedure).

Occasionally the gastroscopy procedure may result in a small nose bleed.  This is perfectly harmless and will stop with in a relatively short time.